WOD
July 31, 2016

Outcast CrossFit – CrossFit

Warm-up

Air dyne 5×20 rest 10 sec

4 tabata rds

couch stretch

8 Tabata rds

5 air squats

10 double unders

10 lunges

5 burpees

Core

9 Tabata rds-

Reverse cruch

Gymnastics

Toes to bar-10

2×5

These are for quality this month we are trying to like toes to bar. If you are not at toes to bar yet we are working on grip strength. this will help you hold on longer for more consecutive knee ups or the scale you are on.

Weightlifting

Do monster walks before Back squatting

Back Squat (3×3 @65%)

Back Squat (2×2 @75 )

Back Squat (2×1@85)

Metcon (Time)

Run 400m

21 thrusters 75/55

3 rope climbs

Run 400m

15 thrusters

2 rope climbs

Run 400m

9 thrusters

1 rope climb

Cool down

Air dyne 3 min

FR-quads/calves

LB-forearms/shoulders

WOD
July 30, 2016

Outcast CrossFit – CrossFit

Warm-up (No Measure)

5x100M Sprints w/ 20 sec rest

FOR 5 MIN – Each minute on the minute complete;

3 pull-ups

5 Push -ups

7 air squats

FOR 5 MIN – Each minute on the minute complete:

2 rounds of bear complex 45/35

(power clean/front squat/push press/back squat/push press)

Core

8 Tabata rds

Side Planks – alt sides

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

FOR TIME:

100 Push Press 45/35

100 Jumping Pull-ups

100 DU’S

100 Air Squats

Cool down

Air dyne/Row 3 min

Foam Roll Calves/Quads

WOD
July 29, 2016

Outcast CrossFit – CrossFit

Warm-up (No Measure)

Run 800m

20 KB

20 wall balls

Metcon

Metcon (Time)

8 MIN time cap

21-15-9 reps of:

Handstand Push-ups

Ring Dips

Metcon (Time)

Start at 10 (12 min time cap)

2 Rounds for time of:

50 Front Rack Lunge 135/95

200m Overhead Carry 45/35

50 Abmat Sit-ups

Metcon (Time)

Start at 24

AMRAP 6 minutes of:

4 Burpees

2 Ring Muscle-ups

WOD
July 28, 2016

Outcast CrossFit – CrossFit

Warm-up

Row 5×100 rest 20 sec

12 Tabata rds

5 air squats

10 double unders

5 pull ups

5 burpees

Core

9 Tabata rds

5 Knee ups/toes to bar

Gymnastics

Ring rows-Max

Ring Rows (1x Max)

Weightlifting

Front Squat (3×3 @60%)

Front Squat (2×2 @75 )

Front Squat (2×1@85)

Metcon (Time)

Run 200m

20 alternating pistols (10 each leg)

20 1 arm kettle bell swings 55/35

Run 200

16 Pistols

16 1 Arm KB

Run 200

12 Pistols

12 1 arm KB

Run 200

8 Pistols

8 1 arm KB

Run 200m

4 Pistols

4 1 arm KB
Pistols are alternating switch each leg

1 arm KB’s are Russian

Must switch arms every 5 reps

Cool down

Air dyne 3 min

FR-

LB-

July 28, 2016

Training Tips: From Wreck to Recovery

By Shane Upchurch

On Aug. 8, 2015, I was hit on my motorcycle by a box truck that ran a red light. I suffered degloving of my lower left leg, three displaced ribs, a bruised lung and swelling of the brain. I spent one month in a hospital and underwent a free flap transplant to my lower left leg, a crainiotomy and a few other smaller operations. After I was released from the hospital, I spent about five weeks on a couch resting. I finally began working with a physical therapist, and in the begin – ning I mostly rode the Airdyne before doing my therapy homework.

After being cleared by my doctors for all activity, I began working my way back to CrossFit-style training. After all, it was arguably this fit lifestyle that helped me bounce back in the first place. In dealing with my return to CrossFit, I’ve learned a few things I think would be beneficial to other coaches and athletes who are coming back from an injury or even just a lot of time off CrossFit. I narrowed my experiences down to five concepts that have helped me the most.

1. The New Normal

When I returned everything felt heavy. My form was garbage at any moderately heavy weight, and it was frustrating and misleading to think of what I had been able to do only months before. I had to quickly learn and accept that my normal was now different than before and would never be the same again. Accepting this fact was actually very relieving because it removed all preconceived notions of what I could and couldn’t do.

The new normal will be harder for some clients to accept, but the sooner they do, the sooner they’ll progress. Depending on the injury they’re coming back from, they might never have the body they used to, and they might not be able to do what they could before. That’s OK. We can call it bad or good, but it really boils down to what you have to work with in the moment. If you’re caught up on what you used to have or what you will have in the future, you’ll never really improve the version of you that is available right now—which is all you really ever have.

This acceptance also gives you a blank logbook to begin tracking your progress. That means PRs every day—at least for a while— so enjoy the journey, acknowledge the victories, and respect the athlete you are today.

2. Volume

Soreness is big factor in coming back from an injury. If you make returning clients so sore that their next days are impossible, they won’t come back. More discomfort is the last thing they want.

It’s better to play it safe than push the envelope too soon. Depen – ding on the injuries or how long the clients have been out, some movements and loads might be accessible but leave them so sore that they’re unable to train. Remember, the goal is to get them to a point where they can exercise and help recovery, not to train at a volume that best prepares them for competition.

In my situation, I started out by staying around the 30-rep range. I also started at very light loads and worried more about positions and full range of motion. Over the course of a week or two, I would bump the reps up by 15-20, and during the following week or so, I would also increase the load slightly. I continued until I could do most CrossFit workouts without being excessively sore for the next few days. I entered the CrossFit Games Open this year with a goal of doing everything as prescribed, and I made it, finishing in the top 40 percent of my region.

3. Strength and Range of Motion

An athlete who is coming back from an injury will probably have some sort of movement restriction, and full range of motion trumps strength 90 percent of the time, especially if we’re trai – ning to be better at life. I had a lack of dorsiflexion in my left ankle, which made it very difficult to go deep into a squat and keep my chest up.

Some days I would throw air squats into a conditioning session and work to a butt target I eventually eliminated. Other days I wanted to work more on strength, even if it was only in a partial range of motion. For squats, I would use a box. I have a client who is recovering from back surgery, and we sometimes work with a trap bar to get him in a better position with a load. Other times we go with empty-bar deadlifts and focus on increasing range of motion.

As range of motion improves, continue to challenge strength in the new range. The end goal should always be a full range of motion with progressively heavier weight, but don’t let the pursuit of full range of motion deter you from lifting heavy at times.

This brings up max lifts. I would never max out in a shortened range of motion, and I didn’t truly max any lifts for several months after returning to activity. I would often find a weight that challenged my technique, and I made sure it was as heavy as or slightly heavier than what I had done before for a similar rep scheme. This kept me progressing at a consistent rate and prevented any new injuries.

4. Perfect Positions

Let’s be honest: Once you’ve achieved a certain level of strength, it’s really hard to go back to the basics. Returning from an injury is a great time to do just that. We’re not training for anything in particular, we need to take it slow, and our conditioning is garbage anyway, so the idea of high intensity seems silly. We also know that perfect positions make a stronger athlete, so why not strive for those positions?

I’ve often said that the best part of returning from ground zero is that I have no excuse not to work on perfecting movement patterns, and I’ll bet I end up stronger because of it. Scott Brayshaw I spent a lot of my warm-up time working on perfecting positions and dealing with different mobility issues, performing exercises such as hollow holds, wall slides, squat holds, single-arm and single-leg work, stability drills and more.

I found Interval Weight Training worked perfectly for this because it allowed to me to work on quality lifting at low intensity, with a more basic movement at high intensity to follow.

Interval Weight Training was created by Pat O’Shea, and the basics involve lifting 5-8 reps at 70 percent perceived exertion, then following up with 1-2 minutes of all-out intensity on another activity. Rest 1-2 minutes and repeat for 3-5 rounds. In the original format, you would then rest 5 minutes and repeat with new movements.

A typical workout for me looked like this:

3 rounds of:

6 low-hang box power cleans

90 seconds for max calories on an Airdyne

Rest 2 minutes

Rest 5 minutes

3 rounds of:

8 trap-bar deadlifts

60 seconds for max calories on a ski erg

Rest 2 minutes

This system allowed me to focus on hitting good positions with submaximal weights while slowly increasing volume, and it also developed conditioning. Interval Weight Training wasn’t the only thing I did, but I added workouts like this into my training, and I still do them.

5. The Big Picture

I couldn’t do a number of things when I first got back to exercising—double-unders, for instance. Jumping rope at all was a chore, and it didn’t take long before I caught myself falling back into old habits and creating plans for how I would conquer double-unders immediately. But why? If my goals were to get back to a level of fitness similar to what I had before and to be able to do things in life without special preparation, why did it matter?

I found that a better approach was addressing weaknesses as I found them, just as I would attack a chipper. Only making a start is needed this very moment.

I began with single-unders in warm-ups, and I kept an eye on volume levels to make sure I wasn’t making any huge jumps. Over time, I tried a few double-unders with almost zero success, and then a few group workouts came up with a format that allowed me to try them again. This went on for a while. Finally, during a workout that had athletes running 400 m and then doing double-unders, I strung together 9. I didn’t get any more in later rounds, and that was OK. Then in Open Workout 16.2 I got 50 in a row!

The Long Game

It’s very easy to get overwhelmed with all the areas for improvement in CrossFit, and we can quickly fall into the trap of wanting to fix everything today. Viewing goals on a much larger timeline really helps keep things in perspective and keeps me from getting carried away.

I plan to live to 100, so that leaves me 68 years to keep working on the things I can’t do today. If your goal is to win the CrossFit Games, then your approach is going to be much different, but for most of our clients the 100-year approach will work very well.

About the Author: Shane Upchurch, CF-L3, is a coach at CrossFit Roots in Boulder, Colorado. He’s been involved with CrossFit for 10 years, and he’s coached for seven of those. His accident opened his eyes to the beauty of the CrossFit community, and he continues to chase his passion of a healthy lifestyle through activity and nutrition. He and his wife are believers in the Paleo lifestyle and plan to have a farm that will allow them to provide real food to their family and friends.

 

WOD
July 27, 2016

Outcast CrossFit – CrossFit

Warm-up

Air dyne 5×20 rest 10 sec

12 Tabata rds

5 burpees

5 ring dips

5 pull ups

Handstand hold

Gymnastics

Ring rows- Max set

Ring Rows (1x max)

Weightlifting

Weighted Pull-ups (1×1 find a max weighted pull-up)

Metcon (Time)

3 rds

40 ft handstand walk

30 sec L-sit

20 Chest to bar pull ups

Cool down

Row easy 3 min

FR-quads

LB-tricepts/forearms

Outcast CrossFit – CrossFit

Warm-up

Run 4×100 rest 20 sec

12 Tabata rds

5 kettle bells

Handstand hold

5 KB SDHP

5 push ups

Core

9 Tabata rds

Alternating elbows

Gymnastics

Ring rows-24

3×8/4×6

Weightlifting

Bench Press

(8×2 Increase weight each set )

Metcon (Time)

3rds

15 cal row

15 floor press 135/95
Rest 5 min from the closest minute then repeat.

Metcon (Time)

3rds

15 cal row

15 floor press 95/65

Cool down

Air dyne 3 min

LB-chest/shoulders

July 26, 2016

Theresa Couture uses CrossFit to rebuild her body after suffering a stroke.

Theresa Couture fell out of her wheelchair in her kitchen, sending the chair flying across the room. As she lay there, home alone, she knew she didn’t have the strength to drag herself to the chair and get back in it.

“That was the final straw for me,” said Couture, who has mitochondrial disease (mito), which manifests itself through dysautonomia, strokes, muscle weakness, and neurological and stomach issues.

She decided to give CrossFit a try in October 2015—with the goal of being able to get back in her chair from the floor.

“Now I get out of my chair and onto the floor and back into my chair without assistance,” said Couture, a founder of the nonprofit MitoAction, whose mission is to improve the quality of life for everyone who lives with mitochondrial disease.

Couture has been wheelchair-bound since March 23, 2015, after her last stroke. She has had strokes before and always recovered, but this one was different: It left her unable to move her legs because the area of the brain that helps her move took the hit.

“I could feel my legs but I couldn’t make them move,” Couture said.

Couture started physical therapy right away after the last stroke. Meanwhile, her daughter, Brianna, who also has mitochondrial disease, was doing CrossFit and making wonderful strides. She encouraged her mom to give it a try, telling her she could strengthen her arms, core and back.

“You always taught me you can’t live like you’re waiting to die,” Brianna told her mom.

With the kitchen incident burned into her mind, Couture headed to CrossFit Wingman in Agawan, Massachusetts, for an interview. The first things she noticed were handicap parking and a handicap ramp—both great signs. One of the coaches, Aaron Zanchi, interviewed her—and she interviewed him.

“He asked me (about) my goals, what I could do from the chair, and (for) information about how my disease impacted me,” Couture said. “As a former ICU/trauma nurse, I was duly impressed. He was educated, welcoming, thoughtful, and proactive in his interview and in his approach to developing a plan.

What was new for me was the focus on what I could do, not what I couldn’t do. That’s a different model. That question brought it positively forward.”

CrossFit: Infinitely Scalable

Zanchi spent two weeks working privately with Couture first to establish her baseline and see what she was capable of before she started attending group classes and working with another coach. Couture’s coach, Zachary Betta, explained CrossFit is universally scalable, inclusive and adaptable to athletes of all abilities.

In December, after just two months of CrossFit three times a week, everything was different from when Couture started, Betta said. In the beginning, Couture was using 2-lb. hand weights and her movements were very, very small. She also didn’t get out of her chair at all. Just two months later, she was lifting a 45-lb. barbell. And she got out of her chair, got on the floor, did adaptive sit-ups, got back in the chair and went to the next station.

She even stood up out of her wheelchair—twice—on her own power, an accomplishment chronicled in a video taken by Betta and posted on the CrossFit Wingman Facebook page. As of press time the clip had almost 900,000 views.

Previously, Couture had been unable to stand or walk, with even the smallest movements resulting in severe muscle spasms and tremors. But because she’s so much stronger now, she stood up with no leg spasms at all.

“That moment was in the middle of a workout when she was tired,” Betta said. “It was an amazing moment for all of us.”

Couture admitted that some days her workout is just getting dressed, transferring to her chair, getting in and out of the car, and getting into the gym.

“On those days, I cheer on others. But I don’t let it get me down,” she said.

Betta has learned to read Couture’s demeanor when she comes in the gym and adapts the day’s workout accordingly.

“If she has lots of energy, I know it’s a good day and she can work hard and make progress,” he said. But he also knows if she works hard one class, she may be tired the next. On those days, they will work from the chair to increase her competence and strength in the chair.

Couture constantly challenges herself.

“It’s easy to throw in the towel,” she said, “but the more you do, the more you can do.”

Betta agreed: “Every time she comes in, she does something new. Her adaptability is incredible. And a big piece is her attitude and unwillingness to give up. She works her (butt) off. She has never missed a day. She’s been this ball of positive energy. I’ve never seen her be negative about anything.”

Her coach also noted Couture is close with a regular group of workout partners—something very common in CrossFit gyms.

“The power of community helps me feel engaged; it helps my body, mind and spirit. You need a community of people to lift you up when you’re feeling down,” Couture said.

CrossFit, Exercise and Mito

Any endurance or fitness athlete is familiar with the term “mitochondria” because the tiny cellular component is solely responsible for all the energy we need for proper cell, organ and body function. In addition, mitochondrial adaption to high-intensity exercise training is known to be responsible for improvements in VO2 max and lactate threshold.

“The benefit of exercise for patients with any chronic disease seems logical since it may improve overall physical and cardiovascular conditioning,” said Dr. Eduardo Balcells, cardiologist with Mountain States Health Alliance; CrossFitter at Iron Mountain in Abingdon, Virginia; and father of a child with mitochondrial disease. “Patients with mito, however, have dysfunctional mitochondria and are therefore unable to effectively produce ‘cellular energy,’ which then affects body parts such as muscle, brain and GI tract—all of which are energy-demanding organs.

“Exercise for people with mito may then seem counterintuitive due to the limited energy production and possibility that exercise may then use up all the limited energy available.”

However, exercise is known to increase the number of mitochondria in our muscles and other organs, and in mito patients this means more healthy mitochondria—more energy. Exercise is exactly what mito patients need, Balcells said.

“In the mito world, people give up on being active,” Couture said. “The fear of something bad happening keeps people from living their life.”

Before the wheelchair, Couture said her life was very small: Fatigue would prevent her from performing everyday tasks such as going to the grocery store. Thanks to CrossFit, Couture now lives a full, strong life.

“I’ve become more safe (in the wheelchair). It’s empowering me to have a positive life. I feel more engaged in my life,” she said.

She added: “Exercise is hard for mito patients, but little activities over time add up to big gains.”

Couture encouraged mito patients to find an activity they love and do it.

“It’s counterintuitive to think that the less you do, the more you’ll be able to do. You have to keep moving. Your body loves motion, even if you have mito. You have to behave (in) your life as if you’re going to live. If you don’t do that, you set yourself up for failure. You have to re-engage in life to become a part of life.”

She continued: “Embrace life. When life kicks you, regroup, reorganize and start again. Keep moving forward. Do what you can do and do it to the best of your ability.”

About the Author: Ginger DeShaney is director of operations and support for MitoAction, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the quality of life for children, adults and families living with mitochondrial disease through support, education, outreach, advocacy and clinical research initiatives. DeShaney was a journalist for 24 years before joining the nonprofit ranks. For more information about mitochondrial disease, please visit Mitoaction.org.

WOD
July 25, 2016

Outcast CrossFit – CrossFit

Warm-up (No Measure)

Row 5×100 rest 20 sec

12 Tabata rds

10 walking lunges

10 double unders

5 pull ups

5 Med ball cleans

Core

9 Tabata rds

Pass throughs

Gymnastics

Ring rows-23

2×7 1×9

Weightlifting

10×1 Power clean

Work up to a heavy power clean

Power Clean (10×1 increase weight each set )

Metcon (Time)

400m farmer carry 25/35

40 power cleans 115/85

40 Toes to bar

40 Bar facing burpees

Cool down

Walk easy 200m

LB- forearms

July 25, 2016

No Intensity, No Results

By Andréa Maria Cecil

To move all significant health markers in the right direction, do more work faster, trainers say.

The only way to know intensity is to experience it.

It is not a mythical creature born of grunting loudest, sweating most or cheering excitedly. It is also not a matter of opinion. It’s physics. Scientifically speaking, intensity is defined as power: force multiplied by distance, then divided by time. Simply put: Intensity is doing more work faster.

“You have to teach people how to do it,” said Chris Spealler, a member of CrossFit Inc.’s Seminar Staff and a seven-time CrossFit Games athlete who owns CrossFit Park City in Utah.

Fran, for example, is a workout most of the general population should be able to finish in roughly 7 minutes or less, he explained. The workout calls for 21-15-9 reps of thrusters and pull-ups. For an athlete who is trying to break into that time domain, Spealler provides the road map: Do the 21 thrusters and 21 pull-ups in no more than 2 sets each, and the break can be no longer than 5 seconds. At the end of that round, the clock should read “2:00” or “3:00.”

“Giving people targets is hugely helpful, and I think that’s where a lot of affiliate owners miss it in the application,” Spealler said.

He continued: “Really, intensity is being comfortable with being uncomfortable.”

That discomfort—doing 5 more reps when all you want to do is stop—is how you become fitter.

“Intensity is the independent variable most commonly associated with maximizing favorable adaptation to exercise,” CrossFit Founder and CEO Greg Glassman wrote in April 2007’s “Understanding CrossFit.”

CFJ_Intensity_Cecil_3.jpgChris Spealler explained that just like proper mechanics in the air squat, for example, coaches must teach intensity.

Favorable adaptation includes improved body composition and improved health markers such as fasting glucose and triglycerides. It takes people from sick to well to fit.

“Be impressed by intensity, not volume,” Glassman is quoted as saying as early as 2002.

Crudely translated, it means this: Do more work in less time—not more work in more time.

Explained via a CrossFit scenario, if you took 10 minutes to do Fran and then did another workout because “10 minutes wasn’t enough,” you did not perform Fran with intensity. If you had, you’d still be on your back. Likewise, you will not reap intensity’s benefits.

The scenario is becoming increasingly common at affiliates worldwide.

“There’s a pervasive thought process going on in kind of the competitors’ circle that more volume equals better, and I see that leak into our regular classes where everybody wants extra work to do,” said Ben Benson, owner of CrossFit Terminus in Atlanta and coach to Games athletes Emily Bridgers, Stacie Tovar and Becca Voigt.

CFJ_Intensity_Cecil_4.jpgBen Benson, coach to Stacie Tovar, said he sees many people opt for volume over intensity with poor results.

When he started CrossFit, he remembered, the mentality was to give 100 percent effort on every workout.

“Now I’m seeing people approach them with a gaming-type attitude,” Benson explained. “It’s a very insidious problem that I’m trying to address.”

Games athletes are able to do more because they can maintain intensity throughout all the additional workouts, he noted.

“They’ve earned that volume, and they have the measurables and the resiliency to do that.”

One way Benson addresses the problem is through scaling.

“On a day-to-day basis … we do a lot of scaling to try to get classes to be on the same page, especially with finishing times. We do a lot of time capping also,” he said. “It’s a culture thing we worked on: not letting people make short workouts huge aerobic-capacity endurance tests.”

For a workout like Kelly—5 rounds of a 400-meter run, 30 box jumps and 30 wall-ball shots—he typically institutes a 30-minute cap. For Grace—30 clean and jerks for time—it’s a 5-minute cap.

“I might do an 8-minute cap (for Grace),” Benson said, adding that he tries to balance such goals with ensuring all athletes feel included. “I don’t want to make the cap so damn hard that nobody ever finishes anything.”

Most members have the ability to complete workouts in a timely fashion and also get a dose of intensity relative to their fitness, he noted.

“That’s one of the arts of coaching a group class: You have to accommodate for what is relative intensity.”

In other words: scaling.

“It’s so important when we get to driving intensity in a class,” Benson stressed.

CFJ_Intensity_Cecil_2.jpgChris Spealler, a longtime member of CrossFit’s Seminar Staff, explained intensity is about doing more work faster.

Spealler cautioned that intensity is not simply telling an athlete to “go as fast as you can” on Helen, for example: 3 rounds for time of a 400-meter run, 21 1.5-pood kettlebell swings and 12 pull-ups. If the athlete PRs his 400-meter run but falls on his back, unable to complete the remainder of the workout in the intended time domain, the coach has missed the point, he said.

“Isn’t that intensity? Well, no. In that workout the goal is to have a good time.”

Same goes for a workout such as Filthy 50, which calls for 500 total reps across 10 movements. Spealler has seen athletes go “just berserk and explode” on the workout upon the advice of a trainer.

“I honestly think that coaches think that’s what intensity is. That’s kind of a real bad idea, actually,” he said, laughing.

But those who pick up the barbell when they don’t want to and push the limits of their discomfort are doing it right, Benson said.

“The people that are approaching it in that manner, they’re getting the most bang for their buck out of their training, not necessarily with volume but with intensity,” he said. “That’s going to be, really, what gives you adaptation. And it doesn’t matter what it is. … Going to your end point—that’s really what drives physical and hormonal change. But I see a lot of half-assing it. And not necessarily seeing things get better.”

About the Author: Andréa Maria Cecil is assistant managing editor and head writer of the CrossFit Journal.

Photo credits (in order): Anne Talhelm, Dustin Tovar, Anne Talhelm